Neon Indian

PHOTO : NEON INDIAN

"Psychic Chasms" by Brigid Gallagher

My dear and talented friend, Brigid Gallagher, is in the running to be an official photographer for the Forecastle Music Festival and she needs your help!  She submitted this stunning shot of Alan Palomo of Neon Indian as he masterfully cast his electro spells at a show in Chicago. 

The communal experience of live music is transcendent, which is perhaps why I find myself at concerts weekly. To me, music is spiritual – and even more so in a live setting, with the band, fans, and environment intermingling to create a truly unique and organic experience. So when I’m able to capture an image that reflects the essence of that moment in time, it makes me feel like I’m even more so a part of that collective “something” that is ultimately bigger than me – bigger than all of us. Merging my two passions, music and photography, is what I want to spend my life doing. This opportunity would literally be a dream realized. I am beyond grateful for this chance. When I captured this image of Neon Indian’s Alan Palomo, they were playing “Psychic Chasms,” so I thought it was fitting to title the shot after the song. It’s hard to refrain from dancing at Neon Indian shows, but at this moment the crowd seemed to halt and watch Alan, who was leaning over his Korg with intense focus. 

- Brigid Gallagher 

I would be forever grateful if you vote for Brigid!!! Just click the photo to be redirected to her voting page.

Brigid’s Official Photography Website
Forecastle Music Festival Website 

Jack in the Pocket's TOP 10 ALBUMS of 2011

Let me break it down for you guys… I normally avoid making “Top” lists. First, because I suck at describing why one album is musically superior to another.  I’m the type of person who listens to something and I either love it or hate it.  I don’t enjoy analyzing their qualities. Music is so tightly wound with my identity, I find it almost impossible to be objective. Secondly, I tend to feel bad for all of the other albums I have enjoyed throughout the year.  Yes, I have tendencies to project feelings upon inanimate objects…

I find it is similar to the emotional struggles of my stuffed animals when I was a child.  I had two favorite toys, a bear and a bunny (creatively named “Bear” and “Bunny”).  I cuddled with them every night, until, one evening, I noticed the other stuffed animals sadly staring at me from their perch on top of my radiator. My nightlight reflected off of their glassy eyes, creating the illusion of tears of sad, neglected children. For months after that, I kept a rotating schedule of which stuffed animal I slept with for the night. But, that was when I was 4 or 5 years old.  Now that I’m 26, I have to call it like it is.

So, without further ado, here follows the list of my top 10 albums of the year accompanied by a personal note on each.


#10 - Radiohead - The King of Limbs

As with many of the latest releases by Radiohead, you either loved or hated The King of Limbs.  Thom York and company continually push themselves and this short but amazing album is no exception. I can attest to this album’s golden road trip qualities.  Especially during night drives, The King of Limbs lingers in dark corners, and oozes sticky trails.  Keep an eye on the road, that may be a deer in the middle of the highway or it may be a Radiohead induced hallucination.

Watch: Lotus Flower by Radiohead.


#9 - Kurt Vile - Smoke Ring for My Halo

I had a moment with this album during my first ever solo drive over 8 hours to Memphis to visit my best friend.  I have been a Kurt Vile fan since YVYNYL included Overnight Religion on his Floating out to Sea Mixtape back in September of 2009.  However, Kurt never caused me to cry, or stir up physical signs of emotion until (as cheesy as it sounds) Baby’s Arms came over my stereo system.  Dawn was just breaking, I was driving through the Kentucky hills, the red and orange leaves were peaking through the mist. My mind immediately went to my boyfriend, who was at home, sleeping soundly in Columbus.  I suddenly felt homesick, and wished he could share this beautiful moment on the road with me.

Watch: Baby’s Arms by Kurt Vile.


#8 - Twin Sister - In Heaven

I love everything about Twin Sister. They are, hands down, some of the nicest, sweetest, quirkiest human beings on earth.  Their music reflects the same.  This 10 track album is woven equally with threads of innocence and darkness, humor and honesty. I constantly add Bad Street to my playlists because I can’t get enough of its silliness. The 1/4th Japanese side of me also applauds their reference to Japanese horror films in their music video for Kimmi in a Rice Field.

P.S. Readers, these guys are awesome house guests, so if you are able to open your home to them while they are on the road, do so.  They have my hostess stamp of approval.

Read Twin Sister’s Jack in the Pocket Interview

Listen to Bad Street by Twin Sister.


#7 - M83 - Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming

The 22 tracks on this album are all pretty great.  The only problem is, I can’t pick out but two or three favorite tracks because they all sound much better if played consecutively.  That factor is what pushed me add Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming to my top 10.  One of the signs of a truly talented artist is the ability to craft an album that stays cohesive from beginning to end.

Plus, this formula is like the first time they put chocolate and peanut butter together.

Listen to Intro by M83.


#6 - Gauntlet Hair - Gauntlet Hair

Everyone knows, I’m a sucker for music with heavy percussion and glitched out guitars.  I can’t resist flailing like a wild banshee whenever I put this album on (which can be quite dangerous while listening in heavy traffic).

You can watch the special last minute interview SpoonfeedColumbus.com and I got with Gauntlet Hair just a few weeks ago here.


Listen to Top Bunk by Gauntlet Hair.


#5 - The Kills - Blood Pressures

I. love. Alison. Mosshart.

Need I say more?  Well, I guess I should elaborate.  I’ve been closely following The Kills since my freshman year of college (2004).  I had the pleasure of seeing them perform at a small 300 cap venue that year as well, and since that night, I’ve had a major crush on Alison. Jamie Hince ain’t so bad himself, but I think even the thought of entertaining a double crush would blow my mind. Besides, he’s married to Kate Moss, so there go my chances. Blood Pressures is an amazing follow-up to Midnight Boom. It’s filled to the brim with The Kills sexy angst… mmm. 

I saw the pair perform in Detroit in May, and even managed to squeak out a mousy, “Hello..” to Alison when we ran into her at the restaurant next to the venue. 

Listen to Nail in My Coffin by The Kills.


#4 - St. Vincent - Strange Mercy

Dear Annie Clark,

How do you manage to be so lovely, with your curly hair, elegant style, and cherry red lips?  How do you manage to be so badass? From the way you wail on that guitar, to the way you craft a song, you make for one sultry songstress.  All the men want you, all the women wish they could be you.  Strange Mercy should be added to a list of “Rock Albums Every Woman Should Own.”  Keep singing, my dear. Keep rocking. I adore you. Adopt me?

Listen to Cruel by St. Vincent.


#3 - Washed Out - Within and Without

Ernest Greene has come a long way from his days of being a Myspace “chill-wave” mystery.  Thank goodness for that.

Within and Without was without a doubt one of sexiest releases of the year.  I mean, just look at the album art! You’re obviously supposed to have the bump-and-grind on yo’ mind when you let these tracks tickle your ear drums. It’s also an awesome album to blast in your car during the warm summer months. For those of you who live in warmer climates, roll down your windows, and let your arm ride the wave of wind, and let the music take you away.  For those of us stuck in weather below 40 degrees, you may want to don a thick coat, mittens, and blast your heat before you try it out.  Or, you could wait until summer, but who wants to do that?!

Read Washed Out’s Jack in the Pocket Interview.

Listen to You & I by Washed Out.


#2 - Neon Indian - Era Extraña

As to be expected, Era Extraña made it into my top 2 albums of the year.  I mean, goodness gracious everyone… it better have!  I saw Neon Indian live 3 times just this year, 6 times total.  I can’t help it. I’ve been a musical admirer of Alan Palomo since Psychic Chasms' kaleidoscopic sounds clobbered my ears that night that changed how I listen to music forever. (If you read the interview linked below, you'll quickly figure out why it sounded so different.)

Era Extraña is a album chock full of songs that take you through the stages of crush, longing, and inevitable heartbreak. I have to claim Suns Irrupt as my favorite track.  It undulates with the same swagger of confidence as Palomo does when he’s performing.

Read Neon Indian’s Jack in the Pocket Interview.

Listen to Polish Girl by Neon Indian.


#1 - Panda Bear -Tomboy

I can’t even begin adequately explain how excited I was for Tomboy to drop. 

That fateful night in September of 2010 at Ottobar in Baltimore, MD in the company of Jimmy from Headunderwater.com and the boys from Everybody Yay turned me into a super-stellar-intergallactic-crazed fan of Panda Bear.  No other artist has ever made a room disappear around me, created sounds that seeped into every pore, and left me feeling simultaneously confounded and elated. My eyes fluttered opened when Afterburner faded out, and I looked around me, grabbed Jimmy’s shoulder and said, “What just happened?!” I had only consumed 3 drinks over the course of 2 hours… what was this audible magic?!

When I listen to Tomboy in the proper environment (lights out, headphones on, bass pumped, laying in bed) I can recreate that moment.  I can’t help but imagine myself as a white feather riding on expanding and contracting waves of sound, through a dark and peaceful forest every time I listen to  Scheherazade. I have no doubt in my mind Noah Lennox will go down as one of the greatest masters of electronic music in history.

Listen to Afterburner by Panda Bear.


Neon Indian | October 15, 2011 | The Grog Shop | Cleveland, OH   
  Photos by  Miharu Kato   
   (Please, excuse me while I gush.)    
 This past weekend Miharu Kato, Larry Doyle (of   SpoonfeedColumbus.com  ) and I piled into my car and drove up to Cleveland, Ohio to see one of my all time favorite bands,   Neon Indian  .  While Larry had never experience the phenomenal mind melt that is a  Neon Indian  show, Miharu and I have seen them 3 times together (before we met, we were in the same audience at 2 other NI shows).  All of us were antsy with excitement. I never fail to feel re-energized and inspired after a  Neon Indian  show; Miharu and I were thrilled to bring Larry along for the ride. 
 I rarely miss an opportunity to see  Neon Indian  since I interviewed lead singer, Alan Palomo, for   JackinthePocket.com   in June of last year. I still remember how extreeemely nervous I was, and, how much liquid courage I needed to conduct the interview. (I was on my fourth by the time we ended that 20 min. conversation.) Nowadays, we can joke around and catch up over some beer or Bloody Marias when our paths cross. 
 He greeted me with a smile and hug when he came out of the green room on his way to watch  Com Truise  melt the audience with his synth swoops. Since our first meeting on that sweaty day in Pittsburgh, Alan released his sophomore album,   Era Extraña  , crafted while spending long, cold days in isolation in Helsinki. That cute curly fro has been tamed into a dapper doo that hangs in a ringlet just above his eye. He’s replaced his semi-shyness with a charming confidence. He never fails to lead to great conversations about anime, music, and  globe-trotting. I always find Alan extremely eloquent and hope he never  relinquishes his nerdom. His onstage persona has become more electrifying, enhanced by the talented musicians he brings on tour. Leanne Macomber (sexy synth goddess) and Jason Fairies (handsome drummerman) have been permanent members since  Neon Indian  started touring in late 2009.  
   
 ( Leanne Macomber - Neon Indian ) 
 It has been such a delight to watch Palomo and his band evolve, and electrify audiences around the globe. I’m so thankful that my friends have also fallen in love with his music, providing us with psychedelic soundtracks to so many of our adventures. While I didn’t get an  official  follow up interview this time (alcohol induced chats at 4 am are not meant to be documented), Alan promised a recorded Skype chat which should hopefully happen soon.  
   
 ( Com Truise ) 
   
 ( Purity Ring ) 
  Miharu Kato  has photographed several artists for this blog, and due to time  constraints, I haven’t had the chance to post any of them with the  corresponding interview.  The photos he took at last weekend’s concert  were so… EPIC!!  I felt the urgency to share them with you all.  Visit  his   website   for more of his work.

Neon Indian | October 15, 2011 | The Grog Shop | Cleveland, OH

Photos by Miharu Kato

(Please, excuse me while I gush.)

This past weekend Miharu Kato, Larry Doyle (of SpoonfeedColumbus.com) and I piled into my car and drove up to Cleveland, Ohio to see one of my all time favorite bands, Neon Indian.  While Larry had never experience the phenomenal mind melt that is a Neon Indian show, Miharu and I have seen them 3 times together (before we met, we were in the same audience at 2 other NI shows).  All of us were antsy with excitement. I never fail to feel re-energized and inspired after a Neon Indian show; Miharu and I were thrilled to bring Larry along for the ride.

I rarely miss an opportunity to see Neon Indian since I interviewed lead singer, Alan Palomo, for JackinthePocket.com in June of last year. I still remember how extreeemely nervous I was, and, how much liquid courage I needed to conduct the interview. (I was on my fourth by the time we ended that 20 min. conversation.) Nowadays, we can joke around and catch up over some beer or Bloody Marias when our paths cross.

He greeted me with a smile and hug when he came out of the green room on his way to watch Com Truise melt the audience with his synth swoops. Since our first meeting on that sweaty day in Pittsburgh, Alan released his sophomore album, Era Extraña, crafted while spending long, cold days in isolation in Helsinki. That cute curly fro has been tamed into a dapper doo that hangs in a ringlet just above his eye. He’s replaced his semi-shyness with a charming confidence. He never fails to lead to great conversations about anime, music, and globe-trotting. I always find Alan extremely eloquent and hope he never relinquishes his nerdom. His onstage persona has become more electrifying, enhanced by the talented musicians he brings on tour. Leanne Macomber (sexy synth goddess) and Jason Fairies (handsome drummerman) have been permanent members since Neon Indian started touring in late 2009. 

(Leanne Macomber - Neon Indian)

It has been such a delight to watch Palomo and his band evolve, and electrify audiences around the globe. I’m so thankful that my friends have also fallen in love with his music, providing us with psychedelic soundtracks to so many of our adventures. While I didn’t get an official follow up interview this time (alcohol induced chats at 4 am are not meant to be documented), Alan promised a recorded Skype chat which should hopefully happen soon. 

(Com Truise)

(Purity Ring)

Miharu Kato has photographed several artists for this blog, and due to time constraints, I haven’t had the chance to post any of them with the corresponding interview.  The photos he took at last weekend’s concert were so… EPIC!!  I felt the urgency to share them with you all.  Visit his website for more of his work.

INTERVIEW : NEON INDIAN

June 12, 2010 | Brillobox | Pittsburgh, PA

Photos by Laila Elizabeth Archuleta


A couple days before New Years my friends and I were gathered in an upstairs room of a house we were renting.   The effects of the night’s consumption were just starting to over take our eyes and ears. The flower curtains were blooming, the table tops swirling, sounds splitting and then rejoining.  Each of us were taking turns on the stereo, curiously choosing songs or albums we thought would blow our minds while under the influence of what we had taken. I giggled to myself as I scrolled through my iPod and landed on Neon Indian.

Everyone stopped. “Who is this?!”

"What album is this?"

"This is so awesome!"

"This is exactly what I want to be listening to right now!"

Since that night, Psychic Chasms has been my go to album whenever I needed a smile plastered across my face.

I arrived at Brillobox in Pittsburgh with half my friends from that trippy winter evening in tow. Laila, the photographer met us outside and we introduced ourselves. A mutual friend had put us in touch when she learned I was in desperate need of a photographer for the interview.  We immediately hit it off.  As we entered, I could hear Neon Indian still sound-checking upstairs, so I ordered a beer to calm my shaking hands and thumping heart.  The restaurant of Brillobox was small and intimate with red booths lit warmly with yellow glass shaded sconces. My friends and I couldn’t resist the delicious smells that were emanating from the kitchen so we ordered a few appetizers while I waited for Alan Palomo to come downstairs.

I was mid-sip in my Dortmunder Gold when I saw him out of the corner of my eye.  Up shot my anxiety.  I always get a little bit worked up before an interview, but this is an artist I creatively admire and had a total geeky crush on.

Alan’s tour manager approached me and introduced himself then called Alan over.  He politely shook my hand and smiled shyly.  He was a bit shorter than me, about 5’6” with a mop of dark brown hair, and intense eyes shielded by large framed glasses.   We settled into a corner booth towards the back.  Alan was sipping a rather spicy looking Bloody Maria…
 

Alan Palomo :  It’s funny, I didn’t start drinking Bloody Marys until I moved to Brooklyn.  It’s kind of like a Sunday custom because everyone in Brooklyn has brunch.  Everybody wakes up, incredibly hung-over around eleven.

KP:  There’s a place in Columbus that has the best Bloody Marys I have ever had.  So, if you ever come through there you have to stop by.

AP :  What’s it called?

KP: Betty’s. So good.  You just came back from Bonnaroo, what, a day ago?

AP  :Yeah,  like 2 days ago.

KP: How was your Bonnaroo experience?

AP : It was unbelievable. It was definitely one of the most surreal experiences I’ve ever had. I mean, when you look at a crowd that big and you realize it’s like 10,000 people, I mean you stop seeing individual people and it just becomes this big undulating flesh toned mass and you’re just trying to process it. So, yeah, it was pretty incredible. The only thing, was during Deadbeat Summer, a group of questionably wasted chicks climbed on stage with like, Indian Feather headdresses, completely topless, with paint, and just ran on stage and just started dancing. I mean, you’re in the middle of a performance of that stature,  and you can’t really stop, you don’t know what to do. So we kind of like just soldiered through the song and it just felt kind of awkward. I think as far as they thought it through, it was like, “We’ll get on stage!!” and then once their up there they just kind of danced aimlessly. Yeah, people thought that we hired them.

KP: Yeah,  I saw that on Hipster Runoff.

AP : It was like, why would I compromise the biggest show we’ve ever played by hiring a bunch of drunk girls to dance on stage in a very tacky fashion.

KP: He tends to misinterpret a lot of stuff.

AP : Of course, that’s his whole deal, his whole sleaze.

KP: You just signed to  Fader Label a week ago?

AP : It’s actually more a collaboration with my own imprint, Static Tongues, So, I mean, I guess it’s going to be working with those guys because I mean, Static Tongues is a completely new endeavor.

KP: Are you going to re-release your album?

AP : Well, yeah, Psychic Chasms in all actuality never really has had a proper full release. I mean, the album was available online and …

My beer glass slides like phantom across the table.

AP : Wow, that was weird wasn’t it.  Just moved on its own!

KP: That was so weird…

AP : It was available in some stores, but if you really went to any record stores, like Amoeba, or Ear Wax in Brooklyn or something, you could never really find it. So this is finally the opportunity to put it out properly.  Aside from that, we have a re-mix album that’s coming out with it. It’s going to feature some stuff from Javelin, Yacht, DNTEL, Who else is on it? Why am I drawing blanks? I’ve been so lethargic today. This is going to kill me, it’s on the tip of my tongue, Here we Go Magic as well, a couple of bands.

KP: How was your experience working with Green Label Sound?

AP : It was good. I mean, like for what it was just putting out a song that was just a collaboration between me and Chris Taylor. I’d definitely say that the experiences were positive. It’s always funny though when you’re interacting with an entity that is in some way affiliated with a company and you kind of have to very distinctly clarify your motivations. You know, it’s like  you’re going to get a budget to make a really awesome music video and have the opportunity to really put your music out there then it eventually becomes about that, it’s not really about that, it’s not really about creating a certain beverage which is just kind of ridiculous.

KP: Yeah, I always thought that was weird that they were associated with Mountain Dew.

AP : Yeah, exactly, but, you know, you have like the Kia singles. Scion sponsors every party. I mean, at some point it becomes a little bit inevitable to flirt with commerce a little bit. You just have to maintain it or manage it in such a way that so that it doesn’t compromise your artistic integrity.

KP: Yeah, they’ve worked with so many artists already. Would you recommend it for bands starting out?

AP : Um, yeah, as long as you have a very distinct and finite vision of what your project’s about and how you want people to interpret it brand wise. Yeah, I’d totally recommend it. I mean, if you’re just someone who takes the road passively and just sort of let people do promotion for you then, I don’t know if I would. You have to take a very active role. Whenever you’re involved in anything like that, I mean, I’m always kind of a skeptic for companies. It seemed like a really great opportunity and the people who were working it were actually really phenomenal.

KP: The music video was really rad. I really enjoyed it. It seemed like you guys had fun shooting it too.

AP : Oh, totally. For me, right from the get go one of the primary motivations was Psychic Chasms didn’t get any proper music video before its release. We’re finally working on them now, which is more coming from the motivation of wanting to make something unusual but make it more centered on the video rather than the singles which have already been out. Sleep Paralysist was an opportunity to have a new song and then shortly thereafter have it come full circle. It was funny because I don’t think people really fully interpreted the song until they saw the video and for me that’s when it finally reached the end game of what I wanted to do with that. People could finally see what it was about. When they see the making of the video at some insane fucking house in Lexington, Kentucky… We just had a really amazing three or four days there.

KP: It seemed like a really cool process. I was reading your tweets about the horse with the LED lights and then I saw Green Label Sound updating the making of it. It was really cool to watch that unfold online.

AP: Awesome!

KP: What’s it like playing with a full band?

AP : Well, I mean…

Glass moves across the table again.

AP :  Wow! There’s some ghosts in the machine!

KP:  [Laughs] I’m just going to set this over there…

AP :  it’s interesting… because the record was written entirely on my own with the exception of Ronnie on guitar for Ephimeral Artery and Terminally Chill. So it was kind of this thing where I had this collection of songs and I knew that I wanted to work with my friends from Denton and I was already working with Ronnie and Jason and Vega. You’re putting yourself in a position in which you have to re-contextualize your own songs to make them enjoyable for a group of people is like kind of a feat.  It’s not something we did right off the bat. I think it took a good twenty shows to let it evolve in such a way that it could really feel like one long fluid set. I mean I think we had a couple of really awkward first runs. You know, each night you’re kind of culminating different ideas until you realize what works, what doesn’t work. You get to the point where you memorize the parts well enough so you can start deviating from them in fun and interesting ways. The best way you can describe it, I remember what James Murphy said about LCD Soundsystem, it’s like you become the best LCD Soundsystem cover band you can be! It feels true in that respect, coz when I was recording it, I never had any intention of putting it in a live format.

KP: So, What’s your recording process like, how do you start creating songs?

AP : Well, it’s kind of funny because with Vega its always been like this formalized pop esthetic where you write a song and it starts out with this verse and it leads into this bridge and chorus.
But with Neon Indian since I tend to work with sequencers so much, I have this simple drum rhythm or synth line that’s like looping, four bars become eight bars become 16 bars, its just like
a circle that keeps expanding, and eventually you hit this four minute mark where you think you have a song and then you start adding all kinds of weird auxiliary shit to kind of make it a little more spontaneous. It’s really weird coz it does feel kind of circular, coz I kind of just you know, space out on these really simple loops and it  becomes something else entirely.

KP: So, I’ve heard two things about “I Should Have Taken Acid With You”…I heard it started it started with an acid trip, or it started with a dream about an acid trip?

AP : It started with a dream about an acid trip.

KP: So, how was that translated into a song?

AP : Well, the full story is that I had a dream that I had taken acid with my ex-girlfriend Alicia, and um, I shot her a text about it. I was like, Ah man, I had this really bizarre dream She said, oh, is that something you’re interested in doing? So, a few months later sometime in December, we were supposed to get together and have this experience where we take acid, or at least some kind of potent hallucinogen, I think she had like Peyote or something. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to make it coz I was in Dallas and logistically I just couldn’t drive down fast enough.  I missed her by a few days. So, needless to say, I felt kind of bad, and a few weeks later I was just thinking about it. It almost started as some tongue in cheek apology. In like six hours I had this track that just kind of flowed out. It was weird coz I didn’t really know what to do with it at first. I tried to re write it as a Vega song, and it totally didn’t work. I realized that that incarnation was exactly what it needed to exist, and if anything, I should just start writing more songs like that. Then I just wrote an entire album.

KP: So, that was the start of Neon Indian. That’s really cool. So, are you still planning on doing Vega, or Ghost Hustler, or anything?

AP : Ghost Hustler is definitely done.

KP: Isn’t a member from Ghost Hustler in Miniature Tiger, or is that somebody else?

 AP : Yeah, that’s something else. Miniature Tiger is just some friends from New York. I’m trying to think, one of the Guys in Ghost Hustler is in Fur now. The other guy has his own project called Love Life. They are all out doing different things. I remember when Hipster Runoff wrote about Love Life, said, kind of sounds like Neon Indian. I was like, man, Noah is not going to like this. I felt kind of bad coz I mean, it sounded like its own thing.

KP: He really likes to start shit. It’s so funny.

AP : Yeah, he stirs the pot! I mean, I know him. He’s a guy from Texas. Yeah, some of the more audacious things that he likes to claim. I have a lot of ambivalence about it. The readership is divided into two kinds of people, right. It’s like the kind of people who understand it as like this jokey voice, his very self referential humor. There’s this kind of like satirical quality about it. Then you have this other fan base, it’s just people who take it completely literally and essentially, it shaped their sensibilities. Its really weird coz he has like this whole mock racist tone and says some really offensive stuff. Then you have like, tweens that are just completely eating it up and taking it without a grain of salt with complete sincerity. HRO is definitely a very ambivalent topic.

KP: Yes, and he likes to latch onto you a lot too.

AP : Yeah, maybe because we know each other. I think at the same time it’s also because he is obsessed with the notion of chill wave given that that was him who coined it.  It’s funny because the interview question that I get asked the most and I have nothing to do with the conception or the coining of chill wave. I mean, I didn’t find out about Washed Out, or Memory Tapes, or Toro Y Moi until much after the fact until we were all apparently part of some movement together.

KP: I actually interviewed Chaz two days ago.

AP : Oh, yeah, Chaz is awesome. Man, that kid is so incredibly talented. I am just incredibly impressed with some of his stuff he’s doing.

KP: Yeah, he’s a really gentle spirit which I liked.

AP : He’s a total sweetheart. He’s a really nice kid.

KP: So, my last question is, Fathers day is approaching, and I know your dad was…

AP : Wait, is that this Sunday?

KP: No, I think its next Sunday so you got a little time, gave you a fair warning. [Laughter] So, your dad was a musician, and he was pretty popular in Mexico, right?

AP : Yeah, yeah I mean, I wouldn’t call him a pop star necessarily coz its also just weird saying that about your dad, But he had a stint in the late 70’s and early 80’s where he had quite a bit of moderate success being a singer in Mexico and he put out two records. By the time I was born, by the time that my brother and I were born, he had already put out a whole discography.

KP: So what kind of influence did your dad have on you as a musician?

AP : Well, if anything, I’ve always really respected that he, especially living in a community and growing up around musicians that are just the most unreliable drugged out, or just the most incredibly drug addled crowd of people that I’ve ever run with. He’s also had this mentality about it that I also see in a lot of musicians that I really respect in general. Like Scott Walker, or Todd Rundegren where they are like these total formalists where they seem that being a musician is a discipline like any other that involves a lot of self sacrifice. He’s always kind of had that. I mean, obviously I’m way looser, because I mean we’re a pretty laid back crowd. You know, we don’t always make it to the hotel lobby on time in the morning, or make sound check. He helps me sort of see it as a vocation and it makes you feel like you’re really doing something and it’s something completely worth losing yourself in. He’s been doing it his whole life and he’s still doing it. I got to respect that.

KP: So he’s really supportive of what you’re doing right now?

AP : Yeah, totally. I think that when I first decided to take some time off school, to just pursue Neon Indian. It was definitely this thing where he  was like, “Oh yeah, you can take some time off. I mean it’s not like we didn’t come to this country so you could get a college education…” Immediately I was like, fuck! What do I say to that!? I got nothing!  I mean I think it took a little time to fully convince them that what I was doing was very much real, and wasn’t just an excuse to sit around and get high and play Guitar Hero  or something! It was like, I’m really doing something Dad!  But it’s funny because I don’t think it was really until Jimmy Fallon or something like that. You can tell your parents that you’re being written about in some blog like Pitchfork or Gorilla Vs Bear or something, but it’s not really going to translate until they see it on some medium that they completely identify with, you know.

KP: I find that that’s a really common theme when I ask people about their parents and how supportive they are. They say their parents didn’t believe it till they saw a write up in the New York Times, or some familiar press.

AP : Totally.

Psychic Chasms is available for purchase through InSound.  Any of you planning to go to Pitchfork Festival?  I’ll be at Neon Indian’s set on Sunday dancing my face off.  Make sure you say hello!

Thanks to Tracey for transcribing this interview for me!